Police books lawyer for threatening female district officer

Rawalpindi: Officials of Police Station Civil Lines on Thursday has booked a lawyer on charges of hurling threats of dire consequences towards a female district officer for launching anti enforcement operation, informed sources.

The accused lawyer has been identified as Mudassir Malik against whom case was registered under sections 186/188/506 of PPC on complaint of Noshia Afzal, District Officer Regulations, they said.

Police have launched manhunt to arrest the accused, sources said.

Accoring to sources, Noshia Afzal, the applicant, lodged complaint with PS Civil Lines officials stating that District Council often launch operation against encroachments which is its prime responsibility. She added she was informed by the council that according to newspaper reports, the residents of Adiala Road are suffering a lot due to massive encroachments there.

Noshia Afzal told police she along with her team carried out an operation against encroachments in Dhama Morr; issued fine to shopkeepers and confiscated the goods displayed by the shopkeepers on roads. She added that a lawyer namely Mudassir Malik entered in her office and asked her to return goods of his client which she refused to do so and suggested the lawyer to adopt legal process. On which, she said, the lawyer misbehaved and hurled threats of dire consequences. The complainant asked police to register case against the accused and to arrest him.

Police filed case and began investigation.

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A car was found buried at a California estate once owned by a man convicted of murder

A car containing unused bags of concrete has been discovered buried in the yard of a 1.63-acre estate in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Landscapers found it at an Atherton home worth $15 million and police are investigating.

On Thursday, Atherton Police Department issued a press release that said cadaver dogs indicated the possibility of human remains, but none have been found. Technicians from the San Mateo Crime Lab were called to the scene.

The car is a Mercedes-Benz, the release said. It had been reported stolen in 1992.

The vehicle was about 5 feet underground and may have been buried in the 1990s, according to the police. It was there before the current occupants — who said they were unaware of the buried car — bought the property in 2020. The prior homeowners had bought it in 2014 for $7.3 million, according to Redfin.

Before that, the house belonged to Johnny Bocktune Lew, who lived there with his family in the 1990s. Police have not mentioned a connection between Lew and the buried vehicle.

Lew’s daughter, Jacq Searle, told the San Francisco Chronicle that her father built the house and that she was shocked to learn of the car. She described a dysfunctional family life at the property.

“My father definitely had emotional issues,” theburied-car-Home-s-former-owner-has-17525310.php” Chronicle quoted her as saying. “This wouldn’t surprise me, just based on how sketchy my father was.”

According to court documents, Lew moved to the U.S. from Hong Kong in 1959, marrying his first cousin two years later. They lived in San Francisco, followed by Los Angeles County where, in 1964, he met Karen Gervasi while attending El Camino Junior College.

Lew and the young woman had a romantic relationship, despite Lew being married. In 1965, Gervasi died from a

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No remains in car buried behind California mansion

ATHERTON, Calif. (AP) — Crews fully excavated a car that police said was buried in the backyard of a Northern California mansion 30 years ago and found no human remains, authorities said Monday.

The convertible Mercedes Benz filled with bags of unused concrete was discovered last week by landscapers in the affluent town of Atherton in Silicon Valley. Cadaver dogs brought to the scene made “slight” notifications of possible human remains on three separate occasions, police said in a statement.

The car was removed from the home by a tow truck and transported Saturday to the San Mateo County Crime Lab for further inspection and processing. On Sunday, ground penetrating radar was used to examine the scene, the department said.

“This examination did not reveal anything unusual or suspicious at the scene and no human remains were located,” it said.

“This concluded our on-scene investigation,” the department added.

Police have not said who owned the car, which was reported stolen in nearby Palo Alto in September 1992, or who might have buried it in the backyard of the sprawling mansion. Police said Monday they had no further comment.

Investigators believe the car was buried 4 to 5 feet (1.2 to 1.5 meters) deep in the home’s backyard sometime in the 1990s — before the current owners bought the home.

Atherton police said the possible owner of the car is believed to be deceased but officials were waiting for DMV records to confirm that.

Authorities wouldn’t say if investigators believe the vehicle was registered to Johnny Lew, who built the home and lived there with his family in the 1990s. Lew had a history of arrests for murder, attempted murder and insurance fraud,

KRON-TV reported Monday that the car has a personalized license plate that includes “Lew.”

Lew died

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Body found in Lake Henshaw area ID’d as homicide victim missing since early August

Escondido police say a body found a couple weeks ago dumped near Lake Henshaw has been positively identified as 71-year-old Stanley Stephens, an Escondido resident who went missing in early August.

Stephens’ body was found Sept. 6 near Lake Henshaw and Santa Ysabel by a road crew working on a bridge in the area, said Escondido police Lt. Suzanne Baeder.

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Stanley Richard Stephens, 71

(Courtesy of Escondido Police Department)

The county Medical Examiner’s Office performed an autopsy and confirmed Stephens’ identity.

Even before the body was found, police arrested 32-year-old Eduardo Zamoro in connection with the killing.

He has pleaded not guilty to a sole count of murder and an allegation he used a knife in the slaying. The criminal complaint indicates Stephens’ death occurred on or about Aug. 10 — the last day he was seen alive.

Escondido police won’t discuss any relationship there might have been between the victim and Zamora, who was arrested Sept. 2. Baeder said the case is still being investigated.

Neighbors told police that Stephens was often seen walking in his neighborhood near North Broadway and Jesmond Dene Road, close to Jesmond Dene Park and Reidy Creek Golf Course. He also was involved in his church, Baeder said.

“He just seemed like a nice guy who walked his neighborhood a lot,” she said.

Stephens was reported missing Aug. 13. Four days later, search and rescue personnel scoured roadsides, embankments and ditches near where he liked to walk. Law enforcement officers initially said foul play was not suspected.

Zamoro is expected to appear at a hearing in December in Vista Superior Court.

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Heights High School parents assured everyone is OK

The initial report of a possible active shooter came in after a fight at the school, Houston police said after they gave the all-clear.

HOUSTON — There were some tearful reunions in the Heights Tuesday after Houston police gave the all-clear when a report of a possible active shooter at Heights High School turned out to be a false alarm. Police determined there was a fight at the school but no shots were fired and no students or staff members were hurt.

HPD officers, SWAT team members and Precinct 1 deputies went to each classroom at the northside school to make sure everyone was OK.

RELATED: Fight leads to active shooter scare at Heights High School in north Houston, HPD says

After checking the entire school, HPD Chief Troy Finner delivered the news that everyone was OK, there was no shooting and there were no injuries.

One dad we spoke with was so relieved at the news that he was overcome with emotion.

Chief Finner said when officers got to a classroom on the opposite side of the building, the door was locked.

“Considering what happened recently in an active shooting,” officers broke open the door, Finner said. They searched the classroom to make sure everyone was safe.

As officers went in, students were asked to raise their hands in the air and give a thumbs up if they were OK.

“It was definitely scary, you don’t know what happens; nothing to guarantee us that we were safe,” one student told said.

“It’s rough. It’s hard but they need an education, it’s like

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STL area law enforcement stress what to do after finding stolen Kia or Hyundai

ST. LOUIS, Mo. (KMOV) – Doing everything it takes did not stop North City resident Tennille Kenny from becoming the latest victim of the growing trend of Kia and Hyundai car thefts in the Metro.

“I took all the necessary precautions and steps that I needed to take,” said Kenny. “They stole my car with a club on it. I actually had a club on my steering wheel when they stole my car.”

Her model, a 2017 KIA optima with a pink memorial decal on the back passenger window, was stolen on September 9. Yet, the meaning behind the car is much more important to her than the car itself.

“That car was in memory of my daughter,” she said. “So now I’m feeling, ‘Wow, they’ve taken everything.”

Her daughter died of type one diabetes in January 2021. She hoped the memorial on the back would deter would-be thieves from taking her car. Since it happened, she is also worried about the contents still inside: some of her daughter’s ashes are in a necklace that she still had hanging inside the car.

“I don’t know if they threw it out of the car or if they left it in there,” said Kenny. “So it’s a bit much to know that she may be somewhere in the middle of the street somewhere.”

Like other residents across the Metro, she’s taken the steps to report her car stolen to local police but has not felt like the process has been seamless.

“They haven’t found it anywhere, so they can’t tell me any hotspots to look at or where they’ve been finding all of the abandoned cars at. I’ve just basically been going on Facebook, word of mouth from other coworkers,” she said. “And I just go look in those areas on my

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Federal judge blocks Arizona law limiting filming of police

PHOENIX — A federal judge on Friday blocked enforcement of a new Arizona law restricting how the public and journalists can film police, agreeing with the American Civil Liberties Union and multiple media organizations who argued it violated the First Amendment.

US District Judge John J. Tuchi issued a preliminary injunction that stops the law from being enforced when it is set to take effect on Sept. 24. The quick decision came after Republican Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich and the prosecutor and sheriff’s office in Maricopa County told the judge they did not plan to defend the law. They were named as defendants in the lawsuit filed last month.

The law was enacted by the Republican-controlled Legislature over unified opposition from Democrats and signed by GOP Gov. Doug Ducey on July 6.

It makes it illegal to knowingly film police officers 8 feet or closer if the officer tells the person to stop. And on private property, an officer who decides someone is interfering or the area is unsafe can order the person to stop filming even if the recording is being made with the owner’s permission.

The penalty is a misdemeanor that would likely incur a fine without jail time.

KM Bell, an ACLU attorney who lobbied against the bill at the Legislature and was in court Friday, said they were pleased the judge acted quickly.

“We are extremely gratified that Arizonans will not have their constitutional rights infringed and their ability to record the police criminalized by this law,” Bell said.

Bystander cellphone videos are largely credited with revealing police misconduct — such as with the 2020 death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis officers — and reshaping the conversation around police transparency. But Republican Arizona lawmakers say the legislation was needed to limit

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In era of transparency, a new Arizona law limits filming of police

FILE - Phoenix Police stand in front of police headquarters on May 30, 2020, in Phoenix, waiting for protesters marching to protest the death of George Floyd.  Arizona's governor has signed into law a measure that makes it illegal to knowly record video of police officers within 8 feet (2.5 meters) or closer without an officer's permission, spurring concerns among civil rights activists about transparency and accountability.  (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

Phoenix police officers stand in front of police headquarters on May 30, 2020, waiting for protesters marching after the death of George Floyd. (Ross D. Franklin / Associated Press)

Arizona’s governor has signed a law that restricts how the public can video police at a time when there’s growing pressure across the US for greater law enforcement transparency.

Civil rights and media groups opposed the measure that Republican Gov. Doug Ducey signed Thursday. The law makes it illegal in Arizona to knowingly video police officers 8 feet or closer without an officer’s permission.

Someone on private property with the owner’s consent can also be ordered to stop recording if a police officer finds they are interfering or the area is not safe. The offense is a misdemeanor that would likely incur a fine without jail time.

There needs to be a law that protects officers from people who “either have very poor judgment or sinister motives,” said Republican state Rep. John Kavanagh, the bill’s sponsor.

“I’m pleased that a very reasonable law that promotes the safety of police officers and those involved in police stops and bystanders has been signed into law,” Kavanagh said Friday. “It promotes everybody’s safety yet still allows people to reasonably videotape police activity as is their right.”

The move comes nearly a year after the US Department of Justice launched a widespread probe of allegations that Phoenix police abused and used excessive force against homeless people. It’s similar to other investigations opened in recent months in Minneapolis and Louisville, Ky.

The Phoenix Police Department, serving the nation’s fifth-largest city, has been criticized in recent years for its use of force, which disproportionately affects Black and Native American residents.

The law has left opponents like KM Bell, staff attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union of

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In era of transparency, Arizona law limits filming police

FILE - Phoenix Police stand in front of police headquarters on May 30, 2020, in Phoenix, waiting for protesters marching to protest the death of George Floyd.  Arizona's governor has signed into law a measure that makes it illegal to knowly record video of police officers within 8 feet (2.5 meters) or closer without an officer's permission, spurring concerns among <a href=civil rights activists about transparency and accountability. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)” title=”FILE – Phoenix Police stand in front of police headquarters on May 30, 2020, in Phoenix, waiting for protesters marching to protest the death of George Floyd. Arizona’s governor has signed into law a measure that makes it illegal to knowly record video of police officers within 8 feet (2.5 meters) or closer without an officer’s permission, spurring concerns among civil rights activists about transparency and accountability. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)” loading=”lazy”/

FILE – Phoenix Police stand in front of police headquarters on May 30, 2020, in Phoenix, waiting for protesters marching to protest the death of George Floyd. Arizona’s governor has signed into law a measure that makes it illegal to knowly record video of police officers within 8 feet (2.5 meters) or closer without an officer’s permission, spurring concerns among civil rights activists about transparency and accountability. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

AP

Arizona’s governor has signed a law that restricts how the public can video police at a time when there’s growing pressure across the US for greater law enforcement transparency.

Civil rights and media groups opposed the measure that Republican Gov. Doug Ducey signed Thursday. The law makes it illegal in Arizona to knowingly video police officers 8 feet (2.5 meters) or closer without an officer’s permission.

Someone on private property with the owner’s consent can also be ordered to stop recording if a police officer finds they are interfering or the area is not safe. The penalty is a misdemeanor that would likely incur a fine without jail time.

There needs to be a law that protects officers from people who “either have very poor judgment or sinister motives,” said Republican Rep. John Kavanagh, the bill’s sponsor.

“I’m

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