Before you pass a bill restricting our rights, remember people like me

Three years ago, I died for 11 minutes and lost all four of my limbs due to medical negligence. Thanks to Florida’s civil justice system, I was able to get justice and carry on with my life. Now, Florida lawmakers are rushing to pass a bill that will severely restrict Floridians’ access to the courts and gut the ability of people like me to recover damages for future medical care and medical devices.

My story begins with me waking up from a coma at a different hospital than I entered, learning that I had gone into cardiac arrest due to an undiagnosed infection, and that because of life-saving measures which shunted blood to my vital organs during the 11-minute code, I was likely going to require amputation of all four of my limbs.

It is by the grace of God, and the heroic efforts of healthcare providers at the receiving hospital, that I am still alive today. Ultimately, I had to watch as both my arms and legs turned black, and all four of my limbs were surgically amputated.

I didn’t have to be a quadruple amputee. Before this all happened, I lived a healthy and active life, working a full-time job, raising four children, and coaching their sports teams.

Quadruple amputee Gary Miracle of Rockledge just after crossing over the finish line of the  Tailgate 2-Miler.  HE is with his sister, Jennifer Falcone, and father, Gary Miracle Sr. At left is award winning marathon runner Marko Cheseto, originally from Kenya, and now a Clermont, Florida, resident, who was one of the race's top finishers. He, too, is an amputee.

Quadruple amputee Gary Miracle of Rockledge just after crossing over the finish line of the Tailgate 2-Miler. HE is with his sister, Jennifer Falcone, and father, Gary Miracle Sr. At left is award winning marathon runner Marko Cheseto, originally from Kenya, and now a Clermont, Florida, resident, who was one of the race’s top finishers. He, too, is an amputee.

Because my injuries were foreseeable and preventable, I was able to bring a claim under Florida law for the medical care and treatment I needed for my permanent injuries. Thanks

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When Does Health Insurance Cover Abortions?

Following the Supreme Court’s overturning of Roe v. Wade last week, Americans who live in areas that ban abortion now must travel out-of-state in order to receive the medical care they’re seeking.

On top of the financial burden created by travel alone, abortions can cost anywhere from $350 to over $1,500. But depending on the state you live in and your insurance provider, health insurance can cover some or all of the bill.

Insider spoke with two health policy experts about which insurance plans cover abortion, and questions to ask your provider in the post-Roe era.

Which types of insurance plans cover abortion?

State policies on abortion health <a href=insurance coverage.”/

State policies on abortion health insurance coverage.


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After the fall of Roe v. Wade, many companies across the US announced they would cover travel costs for employees seeking out-of-state medical care.

Employer health insurance falls into two categories: fully-insured plans and self-insured plans. A fully-insured plan is when an employer purchases health coverage from a state-regulated insurance company.

By comparison, companies with self-insured plans pay for employees’ medical bills directly. about 64% of US workers were covered by self-funded health insurance plans in 2021, according to Statista.

State laws — including those that outlaw insurance providers from covering abortions — can only regulate fully-insured plans. Companies with self-insured plans are “free to make whatever coverage decisions they want,” Sara Rosenbaum JD, a professor and founding chair of health law and policy at George Washington University’s school of public health, told Insider.

“The woman may have to travel and [the provider] would have to make clear that that they’ll let you go out of network for the care,” she said. “But they could certainly cover it.”

Currently, only eleven US states have laws that prohibit abortion coverage from being included in

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