What’s at stake in Wisconsin’s attorney general race? | WUWM 89.7 FM

While much of the spotlight is on campaigns for the governor and US Senate in Wisconsin, there are big stakes in the attorney general’s race as well. The candidates diverge widely on several topics, including abortion law. Incumbent Democratic Attorney General Josh Kaul has pledged not to enforce the state’s 1849 law banning abortion. He’s even sued to block the law. Republican challenger, Fond du Lac prosecutor Eric Toney has said he would enforce the ban and direct resources to local district attorneys’ offices to prosecute violations.

To find out what else you need to know about the attorney general’s race before casting a ballot, WUWM spoke with Marquette political science professor Paul Nolette.

Can you start out by explaining a bit about what the attorney general’s office does?

“There’s a lot of things that the [attorney general’s] office does, both in the civil and criminal legal context,” says Nolette. Wisconsin’s attorney general runs the Department of Justice, which does many things, from running investigations and crime labs to criminal and civil appellate litigation. They issue guidance on laws and join national lawsuits. “And also, they take a lot of actions to enforce state laws,” says Nolette. “So, against individuals, corporations here in the state [on topics] that might have to do with consumer protection issues, environmental issues, other types of legal questions like that.”

Additionally, attorney generals, especially in the last few years, have taken on a much more national role as well, he says. “So, one part of their job that tends to get a lot of attention is joining multistate lawsuits against the federal government, getting involved in federal court cases, as friends of the court. [“amicus briefs”], and really having an impact across a wide range of policy, both on the national and state level.” So

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State bill protecting reproductive digital information heads to Newsom’s desk

ORINDA (CBS SF/BCN) – An East Bay state legislator’s bill protecting reproductive digital information handled by companies headquartered in California passed the Legislature on Wednesday and awaits Gov. Gavin Newsom’s signature.

Assemblymember Rebecca Bauer-Kahan, D-Orinda, worked with Assemblymembers Mia Bonta of Oakland, Cristina Garcia of Bell Gardens and many other co-authors to pass Assembly Bill 1242. The bill was also sponsored by state Attorney General Rob Bonta.

Language in the bill would create a legal path protecting reproductive digital information, in addition to preventing the arrest or turnover of information in investigations related to abortions that are legal in the state, the California Department of Justice said.

“California will not stand idly by as anti-choice states across the nation take radical action to criminalize reproductive rights,” Rob Bonta said. “Abortion is fully legal in California and we’ll fight to protect all who access reproductive health care in our state.”

The bill would prohibit the arrest of anyone “aiding or performing a lawful abortion in California” and prohibits law enforcement in the state from sharing information or aiding out-of-state agencies in an investigation related to a lawful abortion.

AB 1242 would also require out-of-state law enforcement agencies seeking records from corporations in California to attest that the investigation does not involve any crime related to an abortion that is lawful under California law.

“This is an unprecedented step to protect abortion privacy across the country,” Bauer-Kahan said. “We have no obligation to be complicit in enforcing laws that are antithetical to our own values ​​and legal system in California.”

The California Department of Justice said that if another state wanted to track the movement of someone traveling to California for reproductive health care, the bill would block the state from accessing cellphone site tower location data of the person

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What to know about insurance rate increases in Connecticut

Insurance companies that sell policies on and off Connecticut’s Affordable Care Act exchange stunned advocates in July when they asked for an average increase of 20.4% on next year’s individual health plans.

The proposed rate hikes, published by the state’s insurance department last month, also includes a recommended increase of 14.8% on small group health plans.

The requests are substantially higher than what insurers sought last year for 2022 health policies. Carriers in 2021 asked for an average hike of 8.6% on individual plans and 12.9% on small group plans.

“It’s jaw dropping,” Lynne Ide, program lead for communications outreach and engagement at the Universal Health Care Foundation of Connecticut, said last month. “Looking at these rate requests, the ranges are off the charts.

“Our big concern right now is, coupled with inflation and the fallout from COVID, these proposed increases spell trouble. Our concern is that people will take a look at this and decide to go without health coverage, because they just can’t afford it.”

The insurance department is weighing the requests and is expected to issue a decision in September. Before that happens, the public will have a chance to make comments on the suggested rate hikes.

The insurance department has scheduled a public hearing for Aug. 15, beginning at 9 am at the Legislative Office Building (300 Capital Ave. in Hartford).

The public can testify in person or virtually. Sign up for in-person testimony opens at 8:30 am at the Legislative Office Building on the day of the hearing.

The cutoff to sign up for virtual testimony is today (Aug. 12). Anyone who wants to testify virtually can sign up by sending an email to [email protected] with their name and written remarks by noon.

Representatives of the insurance companies will be allotted time to explain

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Connecticut sets up hotline, website with information about abortion rights, availability

To quell “confusion and panic” about access to abortion rights in the aftermath of the Supreme Court’s overturning of Roe v. Wade, Connecticut has created a reproductive rights information line to provide information about access to care.

The line — 1-866-CTCHOICE (1-866-282-4642) — and an accompanying website, portal.ct.gov/reproductiverights, were announced by Gov. Ned Lamont on Friday, the day they both went live. The phone line is available weekdays from 8 am to 4:30 pm Both the hotline and website are bilingual in English and Spanish.

The new resources locate abortion providers, offer a breakdown of abortion rights, give information about paying for an abortion, offer resources about getting transportation help and list community organizations that offer support. The phone line and website do not offer legal advice.

In the news release, Attorney General William Tong described the post-Roe reversal atmosphere as “chaos.”

“Abortion is legal in Connecticut. Despite that, the chaos following the Supreme Court decision in Dobbs has created confusion and panic,” Tong said in the release. “This website and hotline promote access to important information for patients and providers.”

The establishment of the hotline and website are the latest steps the state has taken to protect abortion rights. Connecticut’s “safe harbor” law went into effect on July 1 expanding the right to offer both kinds of abortions — medication and aspiration — to advanced practice clinicians. Before the law, APCs could provide medication abortions but only physicians could do aspirations.

The safe harbor law also protects patients who come to Connecticut from out of state, and protects Connecticut providers, against lawsuits filed by the patients’ states of origin. Connecticut courts will not cooperate with out-of-state investigation of this type and patients and providers can fight investigations begun in other states.

In the news release, Connecticut Department

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Tech giants brace for legal mess of abortion data subpoenas

Technology giants including Apple, Microsoft and Google, facing questions about whether they’d hand over users’ personal data to authorities pursuing evidence on abortion seekers, are bracing for the multistate legal quagmire that will govern privacy in a post-Roe world.

From map searches to private messages, a trove of information stored in the companies’ data centers could be used as a digital trail of breadcrumbs linking a patient to the termination of a pregnancy, a procedure being restricted in multiple US states, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee pledged to block hard-line anti-abortion jurisdictions from accessing information on who travels to his state for the procedure.

California’s Gavin Newsom signed an order preventing medical records and patient data from being shared by state agencies or departments as part of investigations by states that limit abortion access.

The largest tech companies, which have in the past mounted high-profile legal opposition to law enforcement data requests, have been largely silent about what they’ll do in these cases.

Consider a hypothetical online search for abortion pills: A woman in Texas searches for “mifepristone” and buys it from a New York pharmacy. Google may have a record of the Web search, and the receipt may land in a Microsoft Outlook inbox.

Google is based in California and Microsoft in Washington, but digital records of her queries and her inbox may be stored at Google’s data center in New Albany, Ohio, or Microsoft’s in Des Moines, Iowa.

If law enforcement officials in Texas seek evidence from Google or Microsoft, a clash of four different sets of state laws and two companies may ensue.

It’s a question that could be replicated across a host of different online services and data sources-and involve information that in many states could incriminate

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Apple, Google and other tech giants brace for legal mess of abortion data subpoenas

By Dina Bass and Mark Bergen | Bloomberg

Technology giants including Apple Inc., Microsoft Corp. and Google, facing questions about whether they’d hand over users’ personal data to authorities pursuing evidence on abortion seekers, are bracing for the multi-state legal quagmire that will govern privacy in a post-Roe world.

From map searches to private messages, a trove of information stored in the companies’ data centers could be used as a digital trail of breadcrumbs linking a patient to the termination of a pregnancy, a procedure being restricted in multiple US states, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade. The largest tech companies, which have in the past mounted high-profile legal opposition to law enforcement data requests, have been largely silent about what they’ll do in these cases. Consider a hypothetical online search for abortion pills: A woman in Texas searches for “mifepristone” and buys it from a New York pharmacy. Google may have a record of the web search, and the receipt may land in a Microsoft Outlook inbox. Google is based in California and Microsoft in Washington, but digital records of her queries and her inbox may be stored at Google’s data center in New Albany, Ohio, or Microsoft’s in Des Moines, Iowa. If law enforcement officials in Texas seek evidence from Google or Microsoft, a clash of four different sets of state laws and two companies may ensue. It’s a question that could be replicated across a host of different online services and data sources—and involve information that in many states could incriminate not just patients, but their confidants and health-care providers.

“The world has changed in many fundamental ways since 1972—since the pre-Roe world—but one of the most important ways its changed that’s relevant here is we have a digital surveillance apparatus that didn’t exist before,”

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Pa. Legislature passes bills giving health care providers, insurance companies access to mental health records

HARRISBURG — A pair of bipartisan bills that would allow health care providers and insurers to access patients’ mental health records passed the state Senate on Thursday and is headed to Gov. Tom Wolf.

Currently, health care providers and insurance companies cannot access a patient’s mental health records unless the patient signs a waiver. Lawmakers said the new measures would bring state law in line with current holistic approaches to medicine.

Wolf did not commit to signing either of the two billsas he has not yet reviewed them, according to spokesperson Beth Rementer.

Rep. Mike Schlossberg, a Lehigh County Democrat and co-sponsor of the bills, said they would bring mental and physical health out of their separate “silos” and make it easier for doctors to create comprehensive treatment plans.

Currently, if a patient in treatment for addiction is brought to an emergency room, Schlossberg said, the doctors wouldn’t know not to prescribe potentially addictive pain medications.

Mental health care providers have cited the difficulty of accessing records as a contributing factor to burnout, Schlossberg said.

He hopes easier access to records could help mitigate Pennsylvania’s shortage of health care providers.

Both bills passed the House unanimously. In the Senate, though, a handful of “no” votes were for the most part tied to patient confidentiality concerns.

Democratic state Sen. John Kane of Chester County had “major privacy concerns,” according to spokesperson Steve Warhola.

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“Senator Kane’s been in recovery for 38 years. In that community, we hold anonymity in the highest regard due to stigma associated with addiction,” Warhola said. “Under current law, patients already have the opportunity to consent to have their records shared.”

The Drug & Alcohol Service Providers Organization of Pennsylvania sent Kane a statement

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Student Perspective on the Business Law Boot Camp: Adan Abu-Hakmeh | Law



Baylor Law’s Business Law Boot Camp is a week-long program that provides Baylor Law students with a practical, deep dive into various areas of law a corporate or business transactional lawyer deals with regularly. Taught by a diverse team of accomplished transactional attorneys, the Boot Camp courses are delivered via both classroom lectures and collaborative exercises.

Adan Abu-Hakmeh attended Baylor Law’s Business Law Boot Camp in 2022. Read her thoughts on the Boot Camp below.

Why did you apply for the Boot Camp? Did it meet your expectations?

While in Business Organizations I and II, Professor Miller was impressed how much information there is regarding transactional law and strategies but how little time there is to learn it all competently. When choosing my schedule, because of advocacy teams and my concentration in Health Law, I had a difficult time fitting in classes I wanted to take during the school year, so I wanted to boost my foundational knowledge and understanding regarding business law and transactions. Boot Camp was the perfect fit for me to refresh what I have already learned and get a practical basis for mergers and acquisitions, succession planning, tax law, and corporate formation.

What are your thoughts on what you learned during the Boot Camp?

Every single faculty lecturer at Business Law Bootcamp has years of experience, and has framed all of their lessons by teaching us practically how the theoretical concepts we have learned in our transactional quarter apply to situations brought up by real clients they’ve had in their careers .

I was so surprised that the lawyers that came in to talk to us have spoken openly and candidly about the trials and tribulations of their careers and paths to transactional law.

Overall, I deeply appreciate how excited every attorney

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