Former Trump lawyer Ellis censured for falsehoods about election

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Former President Donald Trump (IL file photo)

Jenna Ellis, a former attorney for Donald Trump ‘s reelection campaign and a prominent conservative media figure, has been censured by Colorado legal officials after admitting she made repeated false statements about the 2020 presidential election.

Ellis acknowledged making 10 “misrepresentations” on television and Twitter during Trump’s fight to stay in power after losing the 2020 election to President Joe Biden, according to the censure from the office of attorney regulation counsel in Colorado, where Ellis is from. The statements include claiming on Jeanine Pirro’s Fox News show on Dec. 5, 2020, that “we have over 500,000 votes (in Arizona) that were cast illegally,” and telling the conservative network Newsmax on Dec. 15 that Trump was “the true and proper victor.”

On November 20, 2020, Ellis appeared on the Newsmax show of former Trump spokesman Sean Spicer and said: “With all those states (Nevada, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Georgia) combined we know that the election was stolen from President Trump and we can prove that.”

Ellis was one of several prominent conservative voices who, in the final weeks of 2020, echoed Trump’s claims that the election was stolen from him. Those falsehoods helped fuel the attack on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.

“Respondent, through her conduct, undermined the American public’s confidence in the presidential election, violating her duty of candor to the public,” wrote Bryon M. Large, the disciplinary judge in the case.

Ellis becomes the latest pro-Trump attorney penalized for their attempts to overturn the 2020 election. Nine lawyers in Michigan in 2021 were ordered to pay $175,000 in sanctions for a sham suit seeking to overturn the election in that swing state. The District of Columbia’s bar association disciplinary counsel

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Former Trump lawyer admits post-election misrepresentations

As recently as 2016, Jenna Ellis was not a Donald Trump admirer. She repeatedly described the then-candidate as an “idiot,” adding that she considered him an “unethical, corrupt, lying, criminal, dirtbag.” Ellis even took aim at Trump’s supporters, saying they didn’t care about “facts or logic.”

Ellis nevertheless joined Trump’s legal team a few years ago, becoming a rather enthusiastic proponent, not only of her client’s lies about his 2020 defeat, but also of radical tactics that would allow the then-president to remain in office despite the election results. We later learned that Ellis also exchanged hundreds of text messages with then-White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows in the runup to Jan. 6, and ultimately took the Fifth in response to questions about those communications. Ellis was also ordered to testify before the special grand jury in Georgia that investigated alleged election interference efforts.

But while much of the public has come to expect few consequences for Republican lawyers who engage in such tactics, as NBC News reported, Ellis has had to pay a price for trying to deceive the public.

Jenna Ellis, an attorney who advised then-President Donald Trump as he tried to overturn the 2020 election results, was censured for misconduct Wednesday by a Colorado Supreme Court judge. The Colorado Supreme Court’s Office of Attorney Regulation Counsel said that Ellis violated a Colorado rule for professional conduct that prohibits “misrepresentation” by attorneys.

To be sure, Ellis is not the first lawyer in Trump’s orbit to face this kind of scrutiny. As a Politico report noted, Rudy Giuliani’s law license was suspended, while Jeffrey Clark and John Eastman are awaiting disciplinary proceedings. She also isn’t the first election denier to face court sanctions.

What makes this story especially notable, however, is the fact that Ellis, as part

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Former Trump Lawyer Admits to Her Election ‘Misrepresentations’

Jenna Ellis, former legal adviser to President Donald Trump, has been publicly censured by a Colorado judge for statements she made during the 2020 election.

Presiding Disciplinary Judge Bryon Large signed the order on Wednesday stating that Ellis had acknowledged she violated Colorado’s Rules of Professional Conduct that “prohibit reckless, knowing, or intentional misrepresentations by attorneys.”

“She violated this rule when, as counsel to President Trump and the Trump campaign, she made a number of public statements about the November 2020 presidential election that were false,” read the order.

The court’s public censure for Ellis is effective immediately.

Jenna Ellis Censored for 2020 Statements
Former attorney to President Donald Trump Jenna Ellis is shown speaking during a press conference at Republican National Committee headquarters on November 19, 2020, in Washington, D.C. On Wednesday, Ellis was publicly censured by a judge in Colorado for her “misrepresentations” regarding the 2020 election.
Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty

Court documents state that Ellis agreed that she made several “misrepresentations” after Trump lost the 2020 presidential election to President Joe Biden, including many instances of Ellis claiming that the election was “manipulated” or “stolen from President Trump.”

Ellis once claimed while appearing on Fox News’ Mornings with Maria that Trump had “won in a landslide.”

“President Trump is right that there was widespread fraud in this election, we have at least six states that were corrupted, if not more, through their voting systems,” Ellis said.

In a separate appearance on Fox, Ellis said: “The outcome of this election is actually fraudulent. It’s wrong, and we understand that when we subtract all the illegal ballots, you can see that President Trump actually won in a landslide.”

The court concluded that, in total, Ellis “made 10 misrepresentations on Twitter and to nationally televised audiences in her capacity as personal counsel” to Trump, and that

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Former Trump lawyer censured for falsehoods about election

A former lawyer for Donald Trump’s reelection campaign has been formally censured by a judge after admitting she made repeated misstatements about the 2020 presidential election

ByNICHOLAS RICCARDI Associated Press

DENVER — Jenna Ellis, a former attorney for Donald Trump ‘s reelection campaign and a prominent conservative media figure, has been censured by Colorado legal officials after admitting she made repeated false statements about the 2020 presidential election.

Ellis acknowledged making 10 “misrepresentations” on television and Twitter during Trump’s fight to stay in power after losing the 2020 election to President Joe Biden, according to the censure from the office of attorney regulation counsel in Colorado, where Ellis is from. The statements include claiming on Jeanine Pirro’s Fox News show on Dec. 5, 2020 that “we have over 500,000 votes (in Arizona) that were cast illegally” and telling the conservative network Newsmax on Dec. 15 that Trump was “the true and proper victor.”

On November 20, 2020, Ellis appeared on the Newsmax show of former Trump spokesman Sean Spicer and said: “with all those states (Nevada, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Georgia) combined we know that the election was stolen from President Trump and we can prove that.”

Ellis was one of several prominent conservative voices who, in the final weeks of 2020, echoed Trump’s lies that the election was stolen from him. Those falsehoods helped fuel the attack on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.

“Respondent, through her conduct, undermined the American public’s confidence in the presidential election, violating her duty of candor to the public,” wrote Bryon M. Large, the disciplinary judge in the case.

Ellis becomes the latest pro-Trump attorney penalized for their attempts to overturn the 2020 election. Nine lawyers in Michigan in 2021 were ordered to pay $175,000 in sanctions for a sham suit

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Yet Another Trump Lawyer Is Scorched by Representing Him

Jenna Ellis, an attorney for Donald Trump, has become the latest lawyer to be punished for their actions while working for the former president.

Ellis has been censured by a Colorado court after she admitted during disciplinary proceedings to misrepresenting evidence about the 2020 election, including falsely claiming it had been “stolen” from Trump.

Ellis is not the first Trump attorney to have faced sanctions—or even criminal prosecution—while defending the former president, but is the first lawyer to admit she misrepresented evidence of widespread voter fraud in the last election.

Other Trump attorneys are also facing disciplinary action after getting involved in the former president’s post-election efforts to overturn the 2020 election results.

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Jenna Ellis, former Legal Adviser and Counsel to former President Donald Trump, speaks during the election night party for Pennsylvania Republican gubernatorial candidate Doug Mastriano at The Orchards on May 17, 2022 in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.
Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

In June 2021, Rudy Giuliani had his law license temporarily suspended after a New York court ruled that he made “demonstrably false and misleading statements” about the 2020 election result. Giuliani could still lose his law license after a bar discipline committee in Washington, D.C ruled in December 2022 that he violated at least one professional rule while helping Trump challenge the 2020 election results.

In January 2023, Trump lawyer John Eastman was charged with 11 disciplinary offenses by the State Bar of California for allegedly plotting with the former president a plan “unsupported by facts or law” to overturn the 2020 election results by obstructing the count of electoral votes of certain states. Eastman’s attorney, Randall Miller, told Newsweek in a statement in January that his client disputes “every aspect” of the disciplinary charges filed against him.

Other Trump lawyers

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DOJ Should Charge Trump With Manslaughter Over Jan. 6

Barb McQuade, a former U.S. attorney who served during the Obama administration, believes there is enough evidence to charge former President Donald Trump with the federal crime of involuntary manslaughter due to his inaction during the January 6 Capitol attack.

McQuade, who is also a law professor at the University of Michigan Law School, suggested in an op-ed for MSNBC that the Department of Justice (DOJ) should charge Trump with a crime for instructing a mob of his loyalists to head to the U.S. Capitol building while Congress was certifying the results of the 2020 presidential election.

“This theory is probably a bridge too far for DOJ, but failing to call off the mob when he knew they were armed and angry makes the resulting deaths at the Capitol reasonably foreseeable,” McQuade wrote in a tweet sharing her op-ed.

Five people died as a result of the mob attacking Congress, McQuade noted. Given what Trump knew about the mob — testimony to the January 6 committee suggests he was aware that some of his loyalists were armed — “the loss of life was predictable in light of the size of the mob, their emotional state and their use of force,” trump-commit-manslaughter-jan-6-committee-doj-should-find-n1297314″she wrote.

According to federal law, McQuade went on, involuntary manslaughter requires prosecutors to prove that a person committed an act on federal property, without due care, that could result in someone’s death; this definition also applies to failures to act. Trump’s order for his loyalists to go to the Capitol, after riling them up with incendiary lies about the election being stolen from him, could fall under the definition of the law — as could his refusal to call off the mob hours after their attack began.

“Unlike most members of the public

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Trump drops attorney-client claims over Mar-a-Lago documents

WASHINGTON – Donald Trump dropped his initial claims of attorney-client privilege governing nearly 100 pages of documents seized at his Mar-a-Lago estate, but disputes about executive privilege remain for three records, according to a filing Monday from Trump and the Justice Department.

The disputes are what the special master, U.S. District Judge Raymond Dearie, aims to resolve while reviewing about 11,000 documents. FBI agents seized the records from Mar-a-Lago while searching for evidence of violations of the Espionage Act or obstruction of justice.

U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon appointed Dearie to determine whether to withhold documents from the Justice Department’s criminal investigation because they were personal records or fell under attorney-client privilege or executive privilege.

Trump withdrew his claims of attorney-client privilege for nine documents totaling nearly 100 pages, according to the joint filing from lawyers on both sides. Trump and government lawyers agreed the documents could be turned over immediately to investigators, according to the filing.

Pages from a Department of Justice court filing on Aug. 30, 2022, in response to a request from the legal team of former President Donald Trump for a special master to review the documents seized during the Aug. 8 search of Mar-a-Lago, are photographed early Wednesday, Aug. 31. Included in the filing was a FBI photo of documents that were seized during the search.

Pages from a Department of Justice court filing on Aug. 30, 2022, in response to a request from the legal team of former President Donald Trump for a special master to review the documents seized during the Aug. 8 search of Mar-a-Lago, are photographed early Wednesday, Aug. 31. Included in the filing was a FBI photo of documents that were seized during the search.

The joint filing Monday came after a dustup at a hearing Tuesday, when Dearie encouraged lawyers from both sides to determine where they truly disagree about the status of documents.

Government lawyers said in a filing Thursday that Trump contested nine documents as personal records, including two about immigration he argued also fell under executive privilege.

Six of the nine documents deal with clemency requests, two with immigration and one with a sports program at a

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McConnell and McCarthy keep finding new areas of disagreement

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy raised a few eyebrows last week when he told Punchbowl News that US support for Ukraine would be in jeopardy if Republicans gain power in the midterm elections. “I think people are gonna be sitting in a recession and they’re not going to write a blank check to Ukraine,” the would-be House speaker said. “They just won’t do it. … It’s not a free blank check.”

The GOP leader’s comments did not go unnotified abroad. David Arakhamia, who leads Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy’s party in parliament, told the Financial Times last week: “We were shocked to hear these comments of Mr. McCarthy, honestly.”

Closer to home, Rep. Liz Cheney, who used to serve alongside McCarthy in the House Republican leadership, had a similar response. “At every moment since, frankly, the aftermath of the election in 2020, when Minority Leader McCarthy has had the opportunity to do the right thing, or do something that serves his own political purpose, he always chooses to serve his own political purpose, ” the Wyoming congresswoman told NBC News’ Chuck Todd on “Meet the Press” yesterday.

Cheney added, “Such as the aid to Ukraine, the idea that the party is now no longer going to support the Ukrainian people. For somebody who has the picture of Ronald Reagan on his wall in his office in the Capitol, the notion that now Kevin McCarthy is going to make himself the leader of the pro-Putin wing of my party is just a stunning thing. It’s dangerous. He knows better.”

But while public differences between McCarthy and Cheney might seem predictable, even more notable was a statement from Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell late last week. Politico reported:

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell appeared to break from his House

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Donald Trump’s Latest Legal Battle May Finally Force Him to Confront His Jan. 6 Actions

Donald Trump is navigating quite a few legal situations right now, but the January 6, 2021, subpoena that is coming his way may finally force him to confront how he played a role in the insurrection. By consistently claiming the election was stolen, and then being a major part of an effort to overturn the 2020 election results, according to the evidence presented in the investigation, he may be facing his darkest day yet.

The January 6th committee has put forth information that he was struggling to accept the fact that Joe Biden beat him in the election and as a result, took no issue with his supporters, some of whom were armed, storming the Capitol. During that time, legislators, including then-Vice President Mike Pence, attempted to verify the election results while their safety was being compromised.

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The committee’s vice chairwoman, Representative Liz Cheney, Republican of Wyoming, stated, “None of this is normal, acceptable or lawful in our republic.” Right before the group took a public vote to subpoena Donald Trump, Cheney noted, “We are obligated to seek answers directly from the man who set this all in motion. And every American is entitled to those answers.” The subpoena is expected to be issued in the coming days.

While many political pundits think Donald Trump will challenge the subpoena, there are other Washington, DC insiders who think differently. According to The New York Times sources, the former president doesn’t seem to be opposed to testing, but he reportedly wants to do it live. With time running out with the midterm elections coming up, and Republicans favored to win the majority in the House of Representatives, the committee will likely agree to his terms in order to wrap up the investigation as swiftly as

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Trump Heads to Nevada and Arizona Rally as Legal Pressure Builds

Former President Donald Trump is set to hold rallies to support his endorsed candidates in Nevada and Arizona this weekend as legal pressure from several investigations continues to build.

Arizona and Nevada are two of the most closely divided battleground states, and both are home to several competitive races ahead of the November 8 midterm elections that will serve as a test of Trump’s popularity among the general electorate. He endorsed more than 200 candidates, most of whom won their GOP primaries, in an effort to maintain his grip on the Republican Party before a potential 2024 presidential bid.

Trump will speak in Minden, Nevada, on Saturday night alongside candidates such as Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo, who is running in the gubernatorial race, and former state Attorney General Adam Laxalt, the GOP nominee in the US Senate race. On Sunday, he will travel to Mesa, Arizona, to rally behind Kari Lake in the gubernatorial race and Blake Masters in the Senate race.

The rallies come amid several ongoing investigations into Trump’s conduct and businesses. The House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, riot—when a mob of Trump supporters violently protested at the US Capitol building in a failed attempt at forcing Congress to block President Joe Biden’s electoral win—is set to hold a hearing this week. Several other investigations continue to make slow progress, as well.

trump-rallies-arizona-nevada-amid-investigations.webp?w=900&f=4ca047c651b1f4df5c46c3626a32d963 1x”Trump rallies in Arizona, Nevada amid investigations
Above, former President Donald Trump speaks during a rally in Wilmington, North Carolina, on September 23. Trump is set to hold rallies in Nevada and Arizona this weekend as legal pressure continues to build in several investigations.
Allison Joyce/Getty Images

January 6 Committee to Hold Hearing This Week

The January 6 committee is set to hold its first hearing in weeks on Thursday, October 13 at 1 pm ET.

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