Anna Delvey’s ex-lawyer COLLAPSES in court and is taken away in ambulance as she fights deportation

Anna Delvey’s former lawyer dramatically collapsed in court Friday as the fake German heiress continues to sue for court records to aid her deportation battle. 

Delvey, 32, real-name Anna Sorokin, is facing off against her former attorney Audrey Thomas in Manhattan Civil Court, who she claims is withholding court records that the convicted fraudster needs to fight her deportation case. 

And as proceedings got underway, Thomas broke down in tears, crying out: ‘My heart is hurting me! I need an ambulance!’

After a brief delay while the former attorney was wheeled out of the courtroom on a stretcher, Sorokin emerged victorious as the judge ordered Thomas to hand over the documents. 

Thomas was previously disbarred for financial crimes last year, and has threatened to write a tell-all book about her troubled former client. 

Audrey Thomas, pictured, collapsed in court Friday as she faced off against her former client Anna Delvey

Audrey Thomas, pictured, collapsed in court Friday as she faced off against her former client Anna Delvey

Thomas previously represented Delvey in court after she was charged with fraud

Thomas previously represented Delvey in court after she was charged with fraud

Delvey, also known as Anna Sorokin, pictured in court Friday, previously served time in prison after conning investors by pretending to be a wealthy German heiress

Delvey, also known as Anna Sorokin, pictured in court Friday, previously served time in prison after conning investors by pretending to be a wealthy German heiress

The courtroom drama came as Delvey is embroiled in an ongoing legal battle with Thomas, who she claims withheld recordings of her deportation hearings as she holds a ‘vendetta’ against her.  

The 32-year-old – who was the subject of the Netflix show ‘Inventing Anna’ – claims Thomas violated a July 2022 court order to transfer documents to her new attorney, according to Manhattan Supreme Court filings. 

Sorokin’s latest attempt to hold the former lawyer in contempt was disrupted after Thomas collapsed and fell into tears on the courtroom floor. 

She cried after claiming to struggle for breath, screaming, ‘I can’t do this, I’m going to fall apart! Help me, please,’ while begging

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SNP hits back at accusations poor have limited access to legal aid

The Law Society of Scotland has called for an increase in fees for legal aid

The Law Society of Scotland has called for an increase in fees for legal aid

More than 40,000 people living in the poorest areas of a Scottish city do not have direct access to a single firm offering legal aid, according to analysis.

Research by the Law Society of Scotland found there were no firms operating in 50 of Aberdeen’s “most deprived” data-zones.

In the worst affected areas, there were 29 firms for 100,000 people and nearly nine in 10 had no local access at all.

The Society says chronic shortages of firms offering legal aid is being compounded by the fact that fees agreed in 1999 had only increased by 10 per cent, compared to an inflation increase of 55%.

However, the Scottish Government said it was “up to legal firms or solicitors” to offer services or to take a case on legal aid within an area, and added: “we can’t compel them to do so”.

It said the decline in the number of legal aid firms reflects, in the main, long-term declines in both criminal and civil case-loads.

READ MORE: Ministers say Scots legal aid system is among the best in the world as lawyers say court justice is ‘on brink of collapse’

Support for civil court actions is only offered to people with a disposable income of less than £293 per month – above that amount, there is a cost to be paid, which can be up to full repayment of fees.

The most common civil court cases include divorce and child contact or custody, adoption and immigration and asylum cases but may also involve medical negligence or securing social welfare payments.

The Scottish Government recently proposed an £11 million increase in spend across both criminal and civil legal aid – but this has been described

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Warning Scots can’t access legal aid

Scottish Government urged to take action

Thousands of Scotland’s most deprived families are facing the prospect of representing themselves in court thanks to a chronic shortage of civil legal aid firms.

New analysis by the Law Society of Scotland shows that the 139 most deprived communities in Scotland, resident to around 100,000 people, share just 29 civil legal aid firms between them. There are no civil legal aid firms at all in 122 of the 139 areas.

Of the legal firms in these areas, nearly 90,000 (87064) people are left without any local access at all.

Legal aid is a critical service affecting a range of life-altering situations and is the only way Scotland’s poorest families can secure legal support.

Often, it is during some of life’s tougher moments that people will find themselves in need of legal aid support.

Legal aid for civil court actions is only offered to people with a disposable income of less than £293 per month – above that amount, there is a cost to be paid, which can be up to full repayment of the legal aid cost.

The most common civil court cases include dealing with divorce and child contact or custody; adoption; immigration and asylum cases; and deportation. They also routinely involve securing compensation for medical negligence, securing social welfare payments and other financial situations.

Murray Etherington, president of the Law Society of Scotland said: “Legal aid is a fundamental part of Scottish society. The lack of representation available to those who need it most continues to be an unresolved issue. We have to stop looking at it as just a problem for solicitors – it is a problem for everyone.

£The recently proposed Scottish Government increase in funding may provide a short-term sticking plaster, but it won’t address the deep wounds

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