Former Trump lawyer Ellis censured for falsehoods about election

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Former President Donald Trump (IL file photo)

Jenna Ellis, a former attorney for Donald Trump ‘s reelection campaign and a prominent conservative media figure, has been censured by Colorado legal officials after admitting she made repeated false statements about the 2020 presidential election.

Ellis acknowledged making 10 “misrepresentations” on television and Twitter during Trump’s fight to stay in power after losing the 2020 election to President Joe Biden, according to the censure from the office of attorney regulation counsel in Colorado, where Ellis is from. The statements include claiming on Jeanine Pirro’s Fox News show on Dec. 5, 2020, that “we have over 500,000 votes (in Arizona) that were cast illegally,” and telling the conservative network Newsmax on Dec. 15 that Trump was “the true and proper victor.”

On November 20, 2020, Ellis appeared on the Newsmax show of former Trump spokesman Sean Spicer and said: “With all those states (Nevada, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Georgia) combined we know that the election was stolen from President Trump and we can prove that.”

Ellis was one of several prominent conservative voices who, in the final weeks of 2020, echoed Trump’s claims that the election was stolen from him. Those falsehoods helped fuel the attack on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.

“Respondent, through her conduct, undermined the American public’s confidence in the presidential election, violating her duty of candor to the public,” wrote Bryon M. Large, the disciplinary judge in the case.

Ellis becomes the latest pro-Trump attorney penalized for their attempts to overturn the 2020 election. Nine lawyers in Michigan in 2021 were ordered to pay $175,000 in sanctions for a sham suit seeking to overturn the election in that swing state. The District of Columbia’s bar association disciplinary counsel

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Trump lawyer Jenna Ellis censured over 2020 election fraud ‘misrepresentations’

By Jacqueline Thomsen

(Reuters) – Jenna Ellis, a high-profile member of former U.S. President Donald Trump’s legal team that challenged his 2020 election loss, agreed to be censured by a Colorado court after admitting to making false claims about voter fraud, according to a court ruling.

Under the agreement released on Wednesday between Ellis and Colorado attorney disciplinary officials, Ellis acknowledged making 10 “misrepresentations” about the 2020 election.

The misrepresentations included saying Trump’s legal team could “prove” the election was stolen and that the results were “fraudulent,” according to the opinion by Judge Bryon Large, the state’s presiding disciplinary judge.

Ellis and the state officials agreed that the statements violated a Colorado rule against attorneys engaging in conduct “involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit or misrepresentation,” the opinion said.

Ellis’ attorney Michael Melito in a statement said that his client “remains a practicing attorney in good standing in the State of Colorado. In a very heated political climate, we secured that correct outcome.”

Colorado’s Office of Attorney Regulation Counsel said the censure “reinforces that even if engaged in political speech, there is a line attorneys cannot cross.”

Ellis did not sign any of the lawsuits filed by Trump or his campaign that disputed the 2020 presidential election results, but she was regularly identified as a member of Trump’s post-election legal team.

Wednesday’s ruling said Ellis and attorney regulators agreed that “through her conduct, (Ellis) undermined the American public’s confidence in the presidential election, violating her duty of candor to the public.”

The parties also agreed that Ellis “had a selfish motive” and had “engaged in a pattern of misconduct.”

Ellis was the subject of a bar complaint filed by The 65 Project, a group that has filed ethics complaints against lawyers who alleged fraud in the 2020 election without evidence.

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Former Trump lawyer censured for falsehoods about election

A former lawyer for Donald Trump’s reelection campaign has been formally censured by a judge after admitting she made repeated misstatements about the 2020 presidential election

ByNICHOLAS RICCARDI Associated Press

DENVER — Jenna Ellis, a former attorney for Donald Trump ‘s reelection campaign and a prominent conservative media figure, has been censured by Colorado legal officials after admitting she made repeated false statements about the 2020 presidential election.

Ellis acknowledged making 10 “misrepresentations” on television and Twitter during Trump’s fight to stay in power after losing the 2020 election to President Joe Biden, according to the censure from the office of attorney regulation counsel in Colorado, where Ellis is from. The statements include claiming on Jeanine Pirro’s Fox News show on Dec. 5, 2020 that “we have over 500,000 votes (in Arizona) that were cast illegally” and telling the conservative network Newsmax on Dec. 15 that Trump was “the true and proper victor.”

On November 20, 2020, Ellis appeared on the Newsmax show of former Trump spokesman Sean Spicer and said: “with all those states (Nevada, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Georgia) combined we know that the election was stolen from President Trump and we can prove that.”

Ellis was one of several prominent conservative voices who, in the final weeks of 2020, echoed Trump’s lies that the election was stolen from him. Those falsehoods helped fuel the attack on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.

“Respondent, through her conduct, undermined the American public’s confidence in the presidential election, violating her duty of candor to the public,” wrote Bryon M. Large, the disciplinary judge in the case.

Ellis becomes the latest pro-Trump attorney penalized for their attempts to overturn the 2020 election. Nine lawyers in Michigan in 2021 were ordered to pay $175,000 in sanctions for a sham suit

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Dismissal of DUI case against ex-attorney general Kathleen Kane sought

SCRANTON, Pa. (AP) — The attorney for Pennsylvania’s former top law enforcement officer is arguing that a drunken-driving case against her should be dismissed because prosecutors did not present sufficient evidence.

The (Scranton) Times-Tribune kane-seeks-dismissal-of-dui-case/article_1df635f5-3f42-5ba2-bbde-52e084a6e565.html”reports that defense attorney Jason Mattioli also seeks to bar prosecutors from presenting results of a field sobriety test of former attorney general Kathleen Kane. He further wants to bar video purportedly showing her drinking before her arrest and testimony about her refusal to submit to a blood alcohol test.

Fifty-six-year-old Kane, the first woman and first Democrat to be elected attorney general in the state, is awaiting trial in Lackawanna County Court on charges of driving under the influence and careless driving in connection with a minor accident March 12 in Scranton. Kane has denied that she was intoxicated, maintaining that the crash occurred because she made a wide turn to avoid a snowbank and slid on the ice.

The motions come three months after a magisterial district judge found sufficient evidence to send the case to county court — a ruling Mattioli is appealing — and mirror many of the arguments he raised at the hearing in July.

The arresting officer said he smelled alcohol coming from the car, which the defense said came from another person in the vehicle, but did not detect alcohol coming from her. The defense also cites statements from seven other law enforcement officers, six of whom said they did not smell alcohol or witness signs of intoxication on Kane’s part.

Mattioli said the field sobriety test was an unwarranted “fishing expedition” and established protocols weren’t followed. He also said his client’s refusal to submit to a blood test should also be barred because she was not advised of the legal consequences of such a refusal.

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GOP attorney general hopeful Abe Hamadeh posts even more arguably disqualifying tweets

Attorney General candidate Republican Abe Hamadeh on Arizona PBS where he debated Democrat Kris Mayes on Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2022.

Attorney General candidate Republican Abe Hamadeh on Arizona PBS where he debated Democrat Kris Mayes on Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2022.

I recognize that we live in Arizona, and our standards for those seeking elected office have never been exactly … rigorous (assuming they exist at all), but I’d like to believe a major political party’s candidate for attorney general would, at the very least, have a minimal understanding of the U.S. Constitution.

But, no.

Apparently, the Republican candidate for attorney general, Abe Hamadeh, wasn’t in class the day the Constitution was brought up in, say, middle school. Then missed it again in high school. And college. And law school.

Hamadeh ignores the First Amendment

Hamadeh won the very stiff competition for the weekend’s most ignorant comment on the internet when he tweeted:

“The media is the biggest threat to ‘democracy.’ ”

Threat?

That seems weird since the Founding Fathers seemed to believe the media to be the biggest guardian of our democratic republic. The one profession that tries (often unsuccessfully) to keep politicians honest. Something an attorney general wannabe might understand if he was actually interested in, you know, THE LAW.

Debate gets heated: hamadeh-kris-mayes-show-contrasts-arizona-attorney-general-debate/10450917002/” data-ylk=”slk:Attorney general candidates discuss elections, experience” class=”link “Attorney general candidates discuss elections, experience

Like when the founders wrote in the very First Amendment to the Constitution: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press … .”

It is that same Constitution that Hamadeh, as attorney general, would swear to protect.

Or would he?

Could he?

Then he backs an election denying Oath Keeper

After all, if Hamadeh believes the press is a threat to democracy would he be lying if he swore an oath to

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Texting scams are on the rise, Arizona attorney general says

Pike County department information is becoming available by textijng, starting with the Elections Office using TextMyGov. Text your election questions to 570-409-5770.

Pike County department information is becoming available by textijng, starting with the Elections Office using TextMyGov. Text your election questions to 570-409-5770.

Arizona and the nation have seen an increase in complaints related to texting scams, according to the Arizona Attorney General’s Office.

“Fraudsters are relentless,” Attorney General Mark Brnovich said in a statement. “Text messaging schemes are now on the rise, and people are losing their money.”

The Federal Trade Commission recorded more than 378,000 complaints about text scams in 2021, up by more than 45,000 complaints from the prior year, according to the Attorney General’s Office.

Consumers lost at least $131 million to text scammers last year, the statement said. The median loss was $900 per person.

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich gestures and smiles during his visit to the Yuma Sun in Yuma  on June 2, 2022.

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich gestures and smiles during his visit to the Yuma Sun in Yuma on June 2, 2022.

What does a text message scam look like?

It’s easy to make a texting scam seem legitimate, said Teresa Murray, the U.S. Public Interest Research Group’s consumer watchdog.

“The scammers will do anything to get a response,” Murray said.

More on scammers: scams-beware/8209606001/” data-ylk=”slk:Using LinkedIn to search for a job? Beware these scams when using the professional networking site” class=”link “Using LinkedIn to search for a job? Beware these scams when using the professional networking site

Text messaging scams can come in a variety of packages, but they all have the same goal: to get the recipient to respond with sensitive information. Text scam examples include:

  • Gift or prize offers: Swindlers impersonate well-known companies in a text that includes a link to a survey. They offer a gift card or cash upon survey completion.

  • Delivery deception: A text message asking for credit card confirmation will appear to be sent from a delivery service and ask

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Clark, Conway face off for Rockingham County attorney job | News

RICH CLARK

Portsmouth, Democrat

Ages: 50

Profession: Attorney

What do you believe you would bring to the office should you be elected?First and foremost — integrity. I’m running for Rockingham County attorney to bring transparency and integrity to an office that has been plagued by scandal and controversy since Pat Conway was elected.

I spent the past 15 years practicing law, and I’m a legal crusader for every person in Rockingham County. I’m not a politician or a lawyer that is seeking personal gain. Before law I was a contractor.

I’m running not just for Democrats, but for everyone in Rockingham County. I will ensure that every person receives the legal and ethical due process they deserve that we are not getting.

What are key issues for you?I’m a strong advocate for family and criminal law reform. Laws in New Hampshire are outdated, limit transparency, lack accountability and injure our families. I will run the office while working with the New Hampshire legislature to see these laws are updated and simplified to minimize the requirement of lawyers.

Our present Rockingham County attorney is unethical, lacks transparency, accountability and used the position for self-benefit and I will change that. I will fight corruption, governmental failures, loss of women’s rights and old outdated laws from a century ago that continue to hurt us. Integrity can return to Rockingham County.







Patricia Conway

Patricia Conway




PATRICIA CONWAY

Atkinson, Republican

Ages: 51

Profession: Rockingham County Attorney

What do you believe you would bring to the office should you be elected?With over two decades of prosecutorial experience as a circuit court prosecutor, an assistant county attorney for 16 years and your Rockingham County attorney for eight years, I have a proven track record of leadership, professionalism and integrity.

I prosecuted and litigated thousands

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Southeastern Oklahoma district attorney condemned for taking teaching job while in office

An outgoing district attorney was condemned Thursday by fellow prosecutors “for engaging in conduct not authorized by law” and for his “lack of candor and honesty” about it.

Paul Smith, the district attorney of Seminole, Hughes and Pontotoc counties, called the decision by the District Attorneys Council disappointing.

Smith, 62, came under fire for taking a second full-time job in August teaching at Holdenville High School even though he is still DA until January. He quit the teaching job after the online news site NonDoc reported about it.

Paul Smith

Paul Smith

The District Attorneys Council voted 4-0 to condemn Smith, who apologized for taking the job but denied being dishonest.

“I regret that there was a tsunami of disapproval. I didn’t anticipate that because I was doing both jobs,” he said.

He acknowledged Thursday that he initially agreed to be at the school from 8:05 am to 3:15 pm daily. “I didn’t think that there was anything inappropriate about it,” he said. “I love teaching. I love impacting those kids. I think I did during the seven days I was in the classroom.”

He insisted he was an adjunct teacher and was still doing his duties as a district attorney. “I came in early and I worked late,” he said of his DA job. “And nobody can point to one meeting, one court appearance, one email, one call, one anything that I didn’t do.”

Smith is a longtime prosecutor who was appointed district attorney of Seminole, Hughes and Pontotoc counties in 2017. He was elected to the position in 2018, even though best-selling novelist John Grisham supported his opponent. He chose not to run for reelection this year and plans to teach again in the spring.

The condemnation does not keep him from completing his final months in office. It

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Brenna Bird says it’s time for change at the state attorney general’s office

Brenna Bird, the Republican candidate for Iowa attorney general, said she will defend Iowa’s laws if challenged in court at the Iowa State Fair on Saturday.

Bird, was first elected to be the Guthrie County Attorney in 2018, and is challenging Democratic incumbent Tom Miller, who has served as Iowa’s attorney general since 1978.

At the Des Moines Register Political Soapbox, she said she’s learned about Miller is that he’s out-of-touch with Iowans, particularly those in law enforcement, as she’s campaigned across the state.

“Something that we hear when we’re in different countries, they just haven’t seen our attorney general,” Bird said. “He hasn’t been there. He doesn’t know them. Even if they’ve spent their entire career in law enforcement in Iowa.”

Bird called for more support for the state’s law enforcement officers, calling Miller “completely silent” when it comes to supporting the police and defending them from calls to “defund the police.”

081322-brenna-bell-guthrie-county.jpg
Brenna Bell is a Republican running for Iowa attorney general against long-standing incumbent Democrat Tom Miller.

Bird said as the state’s highest-ranking attorney, she would defend all of Iowa’s laws if they are challenged in court.

“We have a state legislature that passes laws. Whose job is it to defend those laws when they are challenged in court? It’s the job of the attorney general,” she said.

Miller has declined to participate in the state’s legal actions to defend its laws restricting abortion, including a recent push by Gov. Kim Reynolds to reinstate a law imposing a ban on abortions at around six weeks of pregnancy, passed by a Republican-led legislature in 2018.

Bird said Miller has also failed to defend Iowans against what she calls “unconstitutional mandates” imposed by the Biden administration, such as restrictions for the COVID-19 pandemic.

“They seem to think that

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Georgia attorney general candidate vows not to defend state law? But that’s the job

Jen Jordan is running for Georgia attorney general as a Democrat.  (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Jen Jordan is running for Georgia attorney general as a Democrat. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

The following is from this week’s Savannah Town Square opinion newsletter. Get the newsletter in your inbox by signing up at profile.savannahnow.com/newsletters/manage/.

Jen Jordan wants to be Georgia’s attorney general. The office holder’s primary duty is to defend the state and its laws against court challenges.

Not some of the laws. Not just the ones the attorney general agrees with. All of the laws.

Jordan recently pledged on the campaign trail to ignore Georgia’s so-called “heartbeat” abortion law. Her legal opinion is that the law violates privacy protections found in the georgia/” data-ylk=”slk:Georgia Constitution” class=”link “Georgia Constitution and is thereby unconstitutional. Were a plaintiff to challenge the heartbeat law on those grounds in state court, she as attorney general would not defend it.

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Jordan’s stance is disturbing. The legal hair splitting aside, the state attorney general should not get to pick and choose which laws to defend. Lawyers have a professional responsibility to provide the best possible defense to their clients, and often that requires arguing for someone or something in spite of flaws.

No matter how you feel about the heartbeat bill, the legislation was passed by a majority of the Georgia General Assembly, a body elected by the people to craft and pass laws. If Jordan wants to change laws, she should run for governor or stay in her current post in the Georgia Senate. If she wants the heartbeat law struck down, she should step down and file a challenge.

If Jordan won’t defend the

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